Asian-American Scott Lieng Featured in US Navy's New
Documentary Series
Lt. Commander Scott Lieng Is Featured in Navy’s New Documentary Series
He escaped a Khmer Rouge slave labor camp when he was a small child
From Ken Woodmansee

Recently, the U.S. Navy launched “Faces of the Fleet,” an online documentary series that captures the authentic, boots-
on-the-ground lives of the men and women who serve in America’s Navy. Through honest and engaging storytelling,
“Faces of the Fleet” reveals the powerful personal journeys of those who serve, as viewers follow current Sailors through
their daily lives.

The first Sailor profiled in the series is Lieutenant Commander Scott Lieng, who, at the age of two, escaped a Khmer
Rouge slave labor camp in Cambodia with his mother. Together, they eventually arrived in Orange County, CA, with only
the clothes on their backs. Scott was eventually accepted to the United States Naval Academy, where he studied
economics, trained to become an officer, and played Division 1 football. He has spent the past 14 years as a Navy
Supply Officer, serving both military and humanitarian missions throughout the world. View LTCDR Lieng’s profile.

The unscripted series, produced by Navy Recruiting Command, features a new Sailor every month, and is promoted via
the America’s Navy YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram accounts.
“When most think of the Navy, they envision ships, jets, and advanced technology,” said Captain David Bouve, National
Director of Navy Marketing and Advertising at Navy Recruiting Command. “They rarely think of the people, the ones who
know the real meaning of Navy life. These new stories about our Sailors – inside their real environments – provide
prospective recruits with true-life insight into the transformative power of the Navy experience.”

“Faces of the Fleet” is just one component of the Navy’s new branding and marketing campaign that targets 17-to-21-
year-olds, who are part of the emerging Centennial Generation. The campaign, launched in early December 2017 at the
Army-Navy football game in Philadelphia, includes the new Navy tagline “Forged by the Sea,” and primarily engages
audiences through the social and digital media platforms most popular with Centennials.

“We are proud and excited to share Scott Lieng’s exceptional story with young men and women who are considering a
career in the Navy,” Bouve said.

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LT. COMMANDER SCOTT LIENG

•Escaped a Khmer Rouge slave labor camp when he was a small child
•Immigrated to Orange County, CA, where he excelled academically and athletically
•Studied economics and played football at the U.S. Naval Academy
•Currently a Navy Supply Officer serving throughout the world
•Plans to return to Cambodia to build schools

At the age of two, Navy officer Scott Lieng and his mother escaped a Khmer Rouge slave labor camp in Cambodia during
the middle of the night by digging under a barbed-wire fence. A young Thai border guard caught them and held the two at
gunpoint, but eventually allowed them to escape after the woman pleaded that she wanted to take her young son to go to
America.

The mother and son eventually arrived in Orange County, CA, with only the clothes on their backs. Growing up, Scott
worked extremely hard, excelling at both academics and athletics. After graduation, while most of his classmates
enrolled at the local community college, Scott moved east to attend the United States Naval Academy to study
economics, train to become an officer, and play Division 1 football.

Since graduating from the Naval Academy, Scott has spent the past 14 years as a Navy Supply Officer, serving missions
throughout the world. In 2009, he served in Djibouti, Africa for nine months, where he was the Kenya Logistics Officer in-
charge of getting supplies to the U.S. Embassy in Kenya. While there, he also participated in humanitarian missions
building school houses and digging wells for villages. In 2010, he served in a leadership position on the USS Ronald
Regan as part of Operation Tomodachi, which delivered food, supplies, and support to those affected by the earthquake
and tsunami that devastated the northern shore of Japan.

After he retires from the Navy, Scott plans to return to Cambodia, build new schools, and tell his story in hopes of
encouraging young people there to create better futures for themselves. “If only one kid makes it out, it’s a win,” he says.